Welcome
Login / Register

news


  • These are the world's most corrupt countries

     

    Somalia, South Sudan, North Korea and Syria are perceived to be the most corrupt countries in the world, according to Transparency International's latest annual review that draws on a mix of business and government sources for its rankings.

    Somalia has held the undesirable title as the world's most corrupt country for the past ten years, with a score of 10 on the Corruption Perceptions Index 2016, which ranks countries' public sector from zero to 100.

    Countries with a lower score are deemed to be more corrupt, and are generally characterized by impunity for corruption, poor governance and weak institutions, the report said.

     

    Second from the bottom is South Sudan, a relatively new country which only gained its independence from Sudan six years ago, with a score of 11. The third most corrupt country is North Korea, followed by Syria, a war-torn country which is presently seeing a massive outflow of refugees.

    Countries in the Middle East suffered the worst declines on the corruption index, led by Qatar which fell 10 scores from the previous year due to scandals such as FIFA's decision to host the World Cup 2022 in Qatar amid reports of migrant workers abuse, Transparency International said.

     

     

     

    The German lobbying group warned that more countries' scores fell instead of improving from the previous year, creating a "vicious circle between corruption, unequal distribution of power in society and unequal distribution of wealth," the report said.

    The continuous cycle of corruption fueling social inequality has led to disenchanted citizens across the globe, who then turn to populist politicians, Transparency International said.

    But, populist leaders are likely to worsen the issue of corruption.

    "In countries with populist or autocratic leaders, we often see democracies in decline and a disturbing pattern of attempts to crack down on civil society, limit press freedom, and weaken the independence of the judiciary," José Ugaz, Chair of Transparency International, said in a media statement.

     

    more... http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/24/these-are-the-worlds-most-corrupt-countries.html

     

     

     

    Read more »
  • Sudan Arrests 64 Eritrean Ethiopian Migrants Near Libyan Border

     

    The Rapid Support Forces (RSF) on Tuesday has thwarted an operation to smuggle a group of 64 illegal migrants across the desert to Libya, said North Darfur state official.

    In press statements on Tuesday, North Darfur Deputy Governor Mohamed Braima Hasab al-Nabi said the captured migrants are from Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia and Yemen, pointing the group includes 48 men, 10 women and 6 children.

    He added they are currently being held in North Darfur, saying they would be handed over to the Ministry of Interior to take the necessary measures.

    The Deputy Governor pointed the illegal migrants were heading to Libya, saying the preliminary investigations showed that their final destination was Europe.

    He praised the role of the RSF in controlling the borders of the state, stressing their commitment to President Omer al-Bashir directives to combat terrorism and human trafficking.

    Hasab al-Nabi added they seek to capture the masterminds of these operations, saying they are determined to eradicate this phenomenon.

    For his part, the director of the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) in North Darfur Awad al-Karim al-Ghurashi said the migrants were heading to Europe, pointing the government is exerting huge efforts to help the international community preserve lives of innocent people.

    He pointed that this group came from Port Sudan to North Darfur, saying each of the illegal migrants pays large sums of money that could reach $4000 to the human traffickers.

    Sudan is considered as a country of origin and transit for the illegal migration and human trafficking. Thousands of people from Eritrea and Ethiopia are monthly crossing the border into the Sudanese territories on their way to Europe through Libya or Egypt.

    In June 2016, hundreds of RSF elements have been deployed in the remote desert of the Northern State shortly after complaint by the governor of drug and human trafficking by the criminal networks.

    Earlier this month, RSF said it has intercepted the smuggling of 1500 illegal migrants on the Sudanese-Libyan border during the last seven months.

    Last year, the European Union granted a €100m development package to address the root causes of irregular migration in Sudan. The financial support came after pledge by the Sudanese government to cooperate with Brussels to stop human trafficking to Europe.

    In January 2014, the Sudanese parliament approved an anti-human trafficking law which punishes those involved with human trafficking with up to 20 years imprisonment.

    The RSF, which is widely known as the Janjaweed militias, were originally mobilized by the Sudanese government to quell the insurgency that broke out in Sudan’s western region of Darfur in 2003.

    The militia was reactivated and restructured again in August 2013 under the command of NISS to fight the alliance of rebel groups from Darfur region, South Kordofan and Blue Nile states following joint attacks in North and South Kordofan in April 2013.

    On 17 January, the Sudanese parliament passed the RSF Act which integrates the militia in the Sudanese army and provides that its commander be appointed by the President of the Republic.
    Source:sudantribune

    Read more »
  • Why moving the US embassy to Jerusalem is so controversial

     

    Can Trump make peace in the Middle East? 01:31

    Jerusalem (CNN)The United States is expected to move cautiously on President Donald Trump's pledge to relocate its embassy in Israel. A senior administration official has said that moving the US Embassy to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv remains a priority for the president but cautioned that it would not happen quickly. CNN's Oren Liebermann, who is based in Jerusalem, walks us through what's at stake.

     

    So why is moving the embassy such a big deal?

    If the United States moved the embassy to Jerusalem, it would mean that America effectively recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. That would overturn seventy years of international consensus, and, many argue, would effectively signal the end of moves to achieve peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

    Give me some history...

    The United Nations partition plan drawn up in 1947 envisaged Jerusalem as a separate "international city." But the war that followed Israel's declaration of independence one year later left the city divided. When fighting ended in 1949, the armistice border -- often called the Green Line because it was drawn in green ink -- saw Israel in control of the western half, and Jordan in control of the eastern half, which included the famous Old City.

     

    When did that change?

    During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israel occupied East Jerusalem. Since then, all of the city has been under Israel's authority. The city marks "Jerusalem Day" in late-May or early-June. But Palestinians, and many in the international community, continue to see East Jerusalem as the capital of a future Palestinian state.

    Have any countries ever had their embassy in Jerusalem?

    Yes. Before 1980 a number of countries, like the Netherlands and Costa Rica, did.

    Right. So what happened?

    In July of 1980, Israel passed a law which declared Jerusalem the united capital of Israel. The United Nations Security Council responded with a resolution condemning Israel's annexation of East Jerusalem and declared it a violation of international law.

    So countries moved their embassies out of the city?

    Correct. In 2006, Costa Rica and El Salvador were the last to move their embassies out of Jerusalem, joining the rest of the world in locating their embassies in Tel Aviv.

     

     

     

     

    What about consulates?

    Some countries do maintain consulates in Jerusalem, including the United States, which has one in the western part of the city. Other countries -- such as Britain and France for instance -- have a consulate in the eastern part of the city, which serve as their countries' main representation in the Palestinian territories.

    Just to be clear: What is America's position?

    The United States has never had its embassy in Jerusalem. It has always been in Tel Aviv, with the Ambassador's residence in Herzliya Pituach, about 30 minutes north.

    MORE...http://edition.cnn.com/

     

    Read more »
RSS